November 2019

IN THE PRACTICE

YES Connect
Six helpful apps for your clinical practice


by Vanessa Caceres EyeWorld Contributing Writer

With ever-present smartphones and electronic tablets, many ophthalmologists are tapping into the power of apps geared toward the medical field to help them operate more efficiently.
EyeWorld asked a few ophthalmologists to share which apps help them out in their clinic the most. Here’s what they shared.

Epocrates

Epocrates (athenahealth) is geared toward medical professionals and, per its description online, focuses on drugs, diagnostics, diseases, and patient management. “I use Epocrates on a daily basis to look up patient medications, indications, contraindications, and side effects,” said David Aizuss, MD. “I find it invaluable for reviewing medications with patients and answering their questions about both systemic and ocular side effects of anything they may be taking.”
Trent Richards, MD, uses Epocrates as a resource for prescription dosage questions.
Epocrates is available on the Apple App Store and Google Play. The app is free, but its Epocrates Plus version requires a paid subscription.

Eye Handbook

Eye Handbook (Cloud Nine Development) is specifically for eyecare professionals. In addition to serving as a diagnostic and treatment reference, the app has chat forums where eyecare professionals can post pictures and ask questions, according to the app’s online description.
Eye Handbook can help ophthalmologists with vertex conversion and with providing patient education material, Dr. Richards said.
Additionally, Ming Wang, MD, PhD, has found some other uses. “You can easily pull up tests for screening, which can be particularly helpful on the go. Basic color vision and contrast sensitivity tests are available, and a comprehensive coding list is available and can be searched. You can even pull up photos that can be used for patient education,” Dr. Wang said.
Eye Handbook is available on the Apple App Store and Google Play and is free.

GoodRx

Much like its well-known website counterpart, GoodRx (GoodRx) is a resource for medical professionals and patients to help patients find out the price of prescription medications in their area. “My staff will use this to help patients find a good price on medications,” Dr. Wang said. The app also will generate a savings coupon that they can use at their local pharmacies.
The GoodRx app is available for both Apple and Google Play technology and is free.

Dry Eye OSDI Questionnaire

With a growing number of dry eye patients visiting eye practices, the Dry Eye OSDI Questionnaire app (Allergan) can be one way to help assess dry eye severity. Eye doctors can use the app to give the 12-item Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire while patients are at the practice. Although Dr. Wang does not use the app right now, he said that practice staff could potentially give patients an electronic tablet and have them complete the OSDI questionnaire via the app while waiting to see their doctor.
Or if patients have the app, they can share the results with their eye doctor and use the app to regularly measure their symptoms.
It is available for both Apple and Google Play technology and is free.

The Mass. Eye Ear Infirmary Manual and The Wills Eye Manual

Although some ophthalmologists may prefer their print copies of these standby manuals, their respective apps can save some paper and heavy lifting. Both The Mass. Eye Ear Infirmary Manual (Skyscape Medpresso) and The Wills Eye Manual (Skyscape Medpresso) contain the same information as each respective print copy, including office and emergency room diagnosis, flow charts, and treatments for various eye diseases.
“Certain doctors who travel between multiple offices may prefer this over the print editions,” Dr. Wang said.
Both apps are available on Apple and Google Play. The apps are free but provide only about 10% of the content. By tapping on a locked topic, users launch the in-app purchase screen. The cost of the pay version is about the same as the cost of each respective printed manual.

Parks Three Step

Named after the commonly used Parks Three-Step Test, the Parks Three Step app was designed by Todd Zarwell, OD, and is “used to isolate the paretic muscle in acquired vertical diplopia,” according to the app description online.
“Enter your observations for each of the three tests, and the app will suggest which [extraocular muscle] is underacting,” according to the app description. That said, in its description, eye doctors are urged to use their own clinical prowess instead of using the app to fully make their clinical decisions.
“Instead of having to draw out and diagram the muscles, as I have previously done, this app does it for you so you can quickly isolate the affected muscle,” Dr. Wang said.
The Parks Three Step app is available via the Apple store and is free.

About the doctors

David Aizuss, MD
Ophthalmology Associates of the Valley
Encino, California

Trent Richards, MD
Tanner Clinic
Layton, Utah

Ming Wang, MD, PhD
Wang Vision 3D Cataract & LASIK Center
Nashville, Tennessee

Relevant financial interests

Aizuss
: None
Richard: None
Wang: None

Contact information

Aizuss
: daizuss@oaveyes.com
Richard: richard@redolive.com
Wang: drwang@wangvisioninstitute.com

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION

Publication title: EyeWorld; publication number: 1089-0084; filing date: 9/2019; frequency: monthly; number of issues published annually: 12; annual subscription price: $120; publisher: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, 4000 Legato Rd, Suite 700, Fairfax, VA 22033; managing director: Stacy Jablonski, 4000 Legato Rd, Suite 700, Fairfax, VA 22033; owner: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

Actual number of copies issued nearest filing date: 14,431; mailed outside-county paid subscriptions: 15,151; paid distribution by other classes of USPS mail: 0; total paid distribution: 15,151; free/nominal rate distribution by other classes of USPS mail: 0; free/nominal rate distribution outside mail: 720; total free/nominal rate distribution: 720; copies not distributed: 0; percent paid: 95.46.

Average number copies in preceding 12 months: 15,410; mailed outside-county paid subscriptions: 16,164; paid distribution by other classes of mail through USPS: 0; total paid distribution: 16,164; free/nominal rate distribution by other classes of USPS mail: 0; free/nominal rate distribution outside mail: 754; total free/nominal rate distribution: 754; copies not distributed: 0; percent paid: 95.54.

Six helpful apps for your clinical practice Six helpful apps for your clinical practice
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