October 2018

RETINA

News in brief
Handheld device images photoreceptors, holds promise for detection of eye and brain diseases, trauma


Research published in the journal Optica describes the imaging technologies that went into creating a handheld device that has the ability to capture individual photoreceptors in the eye. This technology could be useful in diagnosing ocular diseases, as well as brain diseases and traumatic head injuries. “Until now, the imaging systems required for high-resolution photoreceptor imaging consisted of large, heavy components on an optical table that could only be used with cooperative adults sitting upright,” research lead Sina Farsiu, PhD, Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Ophthalmology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, said in a press release. “Our portable handheld system could expand this important imaging technique to children and infants, as well as to adults who may not be able to sit upright and stare straight ahead.” Dr. Farsiu said that the application of this system extends beyond that of the eye. “Because of the limited resolution of MRI—the standard method for imaging the brain in living people—MRI-based assessment of disease or trauma to the brain cannot be done at the level of individual cells. In the retina, however, individual photoreceptors can be imaged at 100 times higher resolution than using brain imaging, allowing very subtle changes to be seen.”

Reference

DuBose T, et al. Handheld adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Optica. 2018;5:1027–1036.

Handheld device images photoreceptors, holds promise for detection of eye and brain diseases, trauma Handheld device images photoreceptors, holds promise for detection of eye and brain diseases, trauma
Ophthalmology News - EyeWorld Magazine
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2018-10-08T14:31:38Z
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