October 2008

 

CATARACT/ IOL

 

Prophylactic use of moxifloxacin does not increase safety risks


 

 

Intracameral injections of Vigamox (0.5% moxifloxacin, Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas) after cataract surgery are safe as a prophylactic for endophthalmitis, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery.

Stephen S. Lane M.D., University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Stillwater, Minn., and his colleagues performed a prospective randomized combined-center open-label trial of 57 eyes of 47 patients that were treated with intracameral moxifloxacin (250 μg/0.050 mL) or an equal volume of balanced salt solution at the conclusion of cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation.

Dr. Lane reported that the optical coherence tomography results showed no statistically significant differences between the two treatment groups preoperatively or at three months post-operatively. There also were no statistically significant differences between the two treatment groups in all other parameters preoperatively or at one day, two to four weeks, or three months post-operatively.

Therefore, the researchers were able to conclude that there was no increased safety risk associated with a 250 μg/0.050 mL intracameral injection of moxifloxacin, which appears to be safe in the prophylaxis of endophthalmitis.

Reported by: EyeWorld News Services

Prophylactic use of moxifloxacin does not increase safety risks Prophylactic use of moxifloxacin does not increase safety risks
Ophthalmology News - EyeWorld Magazine
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2016-08-01T13:44:13Z
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