June 2014

 

CATARACT

 

Americans unaware of link between common drugs, light irides, and UV-related ocular disease

 
   

A majority of Americans are unaware that taking common drugs and having light-colored eyes can make people more vulnerable to UV exposure, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO, San Francisco).

In a national Harris Poll of more than 2,000 U.S. adults commissioned by the AAO, there were two major gaps in UV safety knowledge. One-third of adults use medications that may increase photosensitivity. However, 49% are unaware or do not believe those medications can cause photosensitivity. These photosensitizing drugs include antibiotics containing tetracycline or fluoroquinolones, some birth control and estrogen pills, and certain anti-inflammatory pain relievers, such as ibuprofen and naproxen sodium. Second, 54% of Americans have blue, green, or hazel eyes. Yet, only 32% of those with light eyes and 29% of all polled know light eyes are more susceptible to UV damage. The survey also found that 83% of Americans wear sunglasses, but only half (47%) said they check for a UV protection label before buying them. Only 32% make their children wear UV-blocking sunglasses.

Americans unaware of link between common drugs, light irides, and UV-related ocular disease Americans unaware of link between common drugs, light irides, and UV-related ocular disease
Ophthalmology News - EyeWorld Magazine
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2016-07-08T15:40:38Z
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